Fashion

Where am I wearing?

Hair extensions

Year: 2008.

Author: Kelsey Timmerman

Type: popular non-fiction book.

Full Reference: Kelsey Timmerman (2008) Where Am I Wearing? A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes. Wiley: New Jersey.

Availability: from the publisher (paperback: UK £12.99 link), amazon.com (new from: US $10.75; used from: US $4.15 link), amazon.co.uk (new from: UK £11.69; used from: UK £8.69 link).

Page reference: Baker, E., Bird, E., Crease, G., Crookes, I. & Sucker, C. (2012) Where Am I Wearing? followthethings.com (http://followthethings.com/whereamiwearing.shtml, last accessed: <insert date here>)

Lego re-creations

[click photos for text]

Descriptions

One man’s quest to meet the people who made his clothes. (Source: TheTouronKing 2009 link).

Freelance writer Kelsey Timmerman got curious about where his clothes came from, so he started wandering the globe to find the factories where they were made (Source: WorldVision ndc np link).

[It] grew from one of those random ideas that people have everyday, but few people actually follow through on. Standing around in his clothes and pondering the fact that he was an American clad completely in clothing made outside of America, Timmerman wondered what exactly those “Made in” labels meant in human terms. Who are these people making America’s clothes? Who made the very clothes he was wearing that day? What followed was a journey to the world’s garment factories to find the factories that made those clothes his jeans, his T-shirt, his flip-flops, and his boxers (Source: Anon 2008 np link).

This book is about clothes, about culture. About people. About shopping. Conscience. Poverty (Source: WordLily 2008 np link).

Part travel book, part eco awareness, this story takes the author to the factories that produced his jeans, shirts, sneakers (Source: Ellen 2009 np link).

... the real charm of this book is the fact that Timmerman takes the global issue of globalization and attempts to see what it means to people on a personal level (Source: Witherow 2009 p.11 link).

It’s described as: “A travel journalist’s look into the countries, factories, and people that make our clothes.” Would it be a reference book? A journal? (Source: Wrighty 2008 np link).

... a human interest story that gives us a glimpse of not only how our clothing is made, but also who makes it (Source: Rebekah 2011 np link).

.. a compelling mixture of personal anecdote, humor and insight, all informed by extensive research into the history and economics of the global garment industry (Source: Holland 2008 np link).

... a personal touch about the people who made your clothes and a tour through the streets, villages, and cities that they live in (Source: J. Roper HistoryTeach 2009 np link).

A human perspective on globalization. Friendly, not preachy. Definitely thought provoking (Source: Mascari 2011 np link).

... a personal take on a global issue. The corporate version of travel writing (Source: French 2008 np link).

... a clever concoction of memoir, travelogue, and narrative nonfiction - by Kelsey Timmerman, popular travel blogger and the original Traveling Touron (Source: Joshua 2009 np link).

Bouncing between two very different worlds – that of impoverished garment workers and his own Western lifestyle – Timmerman puts a personal face on the controversial issues of globalization and outsourcing. Whether bowling with workers in Cambodia or riding a roller coaster with laborers in Bangladesh, he bridges the gap between impersonal economic forces and the people most directly affected by them. For anyone who wants to truly understand the real issues and the human costs of globalization, Where Am I Wearing? is an indispensable and unforgettable journey (Source: Anon 2008 np link).

Globalization makes it difficult to know where the things you buy come from. Journalist and travel writer Kelsey Timmerman wanted to know where his clothes came from and who made them, so he traveled from Honduras to Bangladesh to Cambodia to China and back. Along the way, he met the people who made his favorite clothes and learned as much about them as he did about globalization itself. Enlightening and controversial at once, this book puts a human face on globalization (Source: Amazon 2011 np link).

The concept is elegant in its simplicity. Timmerman, at the time a recently-minted college graduate, ponders a pile of his clothes on the floor. Shortly thereafter, he embarks on a global journey to meet the people who had made five of his favorite articles of clothing. Those items were: (1) his favorite t-shirt (Honduras), (2) his underwear (Bangladesh), (3) his Levi’s (Cambodia), (4) his flip-flops (China), and (5) his “Champion USA” shorts (Canada) (Source: Julie H. 2011 np link).

The book is a first hand account of Kelsey’s travels around the world to various countries to find out where is clothes were made. In the first part he mentions going to Honduras to see where is tshirt was made. He talks about the fact that the workers only get paid $50/month. Its not until he gets to Bangladesh in search of the workers who made his boxers that the book starts to pick up. He starts to learn about the workers who work in the factories. Its there that he visits his first factory. He goes to Cambodia in search of the Levi’s factory and then China for his Teva flip flops. Its in China that he manages to get into trouble with the VIP of Global Sourcing of Decker Outfitters. He claims that Kelsey has been using his name saying they are friends to get info. Its in China that he visits a Walmart. A Walmart that is much different from the ones here. Its the 10 largest retailer there and there is about 100 Walmarts in China (Source: Cindy 2008 np link).

Although Timmerman touches on the economics of the garment industry, his main focus is on the people and their difficult lives. A common thread among each of these workers is family. Many of them leave small villages to work in the city and send money home to support their parents, siblings, and often their own children. With little opportunity back home, the small wages of manufacturing jobs bring some stability and hope for survival (Source: Rebekah 2011 np link).

I picked up this book expecting more of a guide on what companies to avoid buying clothes from, but it is not that kind of book. I enjoyed "traveling" to Honduras, China, Bangladesh, Cambodia, and the United States and hearing the stories - Timmerman's writing style is funny and easy to read and it didn't take me long to finish the book (Source: Shepherd 2012 np link).

This is not a typical book about the globalization of the apparel industry; Timmerman is neither an activist nor an industry defender. Indeed, he has no expertise or special interest beyond the fact that he wonders how the clothing he wears is made. Presenting himself as the ultimate boy next door from a working-class family in Ohio, he uses a casual tone more reminiscent of blogging than muckraking. His curiosity about the origins of his T-shirts, sandals, and other clothing leads him to factories in Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, and Honduras. He takes on the project with few preconceptions and little knowledge and perseveres with a charming lack of guile. That sincerity, plus an honest skepticism, allows him to avoid preachiness. This book does not explore the reasons for global inequalities and cannot replace even journalistic accounts, let alone scholarly ones, but for readers seeking a first humane glimpse of the situation without complex arguments or finger-shaking moralism, this is an agreeable choice (Source: Klopfer nda np link).

Inspiration / Process / Technique / Methodology

Timmerman’s research began with the simple act of checking the labels on his clothes, curious about places of origin for his shirt, jeans, boxers, and flip flops. He then decided to travel to those places—Honduras, Cambodia, Bangladesh and China - to go undercover as a garment buyer in order to meet the people who made his clothes. He wanted to know not only their working conditions, but also their names, personalities, and dreams. He wanted to somehow bridge the divide between producer and consumer and put faces to the industry (Source: George 2009 np link).

Ninety-seven percent of our clothes are made overseas. Yet globalization makes it difficult to know much about the origin of the products we buy – beyond the standard “Made in” label. So I decided to visit each of the countries and the factories where my five favorite items of clothing were made, and meet the workers. I knew the basics of globalized labor – the forces, processes, economics, and politics at work. But what was lost among all those facts and numbers was an understanding of the lives, personalities, hopes, and dreams of the people who made my clothes (Source: Timmerman 2008 np link).

… I seek to connect people through words and pictures. I believe that if we reduce global issues to the stories of individual people, we can better see ourselves, our parents, our sons and daughters, and our hopes and struggles in one another (Source: Timmerman ndb np link).

Timmerman’s goal in writing the book was to force consciousness of our clothing’s origins — and how closely our buying habits are connected to the fates of those who produce it (Source: Stein 2008 np link).

The garment workers and their families let me into their lives, fed me, told me their struggles, played ultimate Frisbee with me, and went bowling with me. I kind of feel like it’s my mission to tell their story. I have a digital photo frame on my desk that scrolls through photos of the workers. They drive me to work harder, write longer, and to edit just one more time… I met Amilcar in 2005 in Honduras. In 2007 I traveled to Bangladesh, Cambodia, and China. In January of 2008 I signed with Wiley & Sons to write the book. They asked me if I could have it done in four months. At the time I had hardly written anything longer than 1,500 words… “Of course I can write a book in four months,” I told them. “No problem.” And lucky for me it wasn’t (Source: Timmerman 2009 np link).

He has no agenda other than curiosity (Source: Shannon 2009 np link).

In part a journey to discover his position in the global marketplace, he tells us, it was also “to put off committing to his relationship with Annie, [his] growing impatient girlfriend of 10 years.” He didn’t want to grow up so he travelled (Source: Jacobs 2009 np link).

Kelsey does not have a predetermined action plan. He’s not out to ‘nail’ anyone in particular. It is simply a chronicle of his own journey from naiveté to understanding ... He follows the news, though, and is aware of the existence of sweatshops. Somewhere along the way, it began tickling at his mind that the sporting apparel he is passing over the counter to people might have been made under inhumane conditions but he has no way of knowing it. So he goes to find out and the result is this book, Where Am I Wearing? (Source: Walker 2011 np link).

Discussion / Responses

Long story short, this book is not about getting angry. It’s about getting busy and framing the discussion in such a fashion that we might actually make some progress. And a great place to start is to actually have the “Where do our clothes come from, in what conditions are they produced, what are the human rights records of the nations to which many companies source their jobs, and how readily available is such information to us as consumers?” conversation. This is a great book to read for personal edification (Source: Julie H. 2011 np link).

This book takes you places you had never considered and makes you look at your clothing in new ways. I thought that Kelsey was respectful with his subjects - without being preachy, overly sentimental or having a strong agenda. While he raised ethical issues and questions around clothing production and the conditions people work in - he did so in a way that is a conversation starter (rather than a my way or the highway you get with some authors) (Source: Marie 2008 np link).

I picked up this book expecting more of a guide on what companies to avoid buying clothes from, but it is not that kind of book. I enjoyed “traveling” to Honduras, China, Bangladesh, Cambodia, and the United States and hearing the stories - Timmerman’s writing style is funny and easy to read and it didn’t take me long to finish the book (Source: Shepherd 2012 np link).

Timmerman presents the ongoing battling question many of us find ourselves questioning with regards to the consequences globalization has brought upon since the 1990s. Is globalization a good or bad thing? How do we even begin to answer such a question? Timmerman I believe does a great way of taking those basic steps that needs to be taken in order to try to answer that question, which is putting yourself in the shoes of those that are on the other side of the spectrum regarding this relationship of power that globalization has created and that continues to fuel… (Source: Perez 2012 np link).

Kelsey Timmerman sets out on a mission to discover who makes his clothes. I love that idea. I often wonder who it is that works those factory machines cutting, sewing or gluing our clothing and shoes together. Kelsey tried to track down some of those exact factories and exact people to find out the truth about child labor and so called sweatshops. He was not totally successful and I think there is more to uncover. The main thought I came away with is whether we should boycott the clothing lines or stores that do indeed have young people working long hours sometimes for free or do we realize that because of our business that child sends money home so his family does not starve? Lots to think about (Source: KrisT 2010 np link).

Great book, eye opening and informative while also very entertaining to read. In our world of dehumanization and mechanization, it’s so easy to just walk into a store and buy a product off a shelf, never once thinking about where it came from or who made it. But its important to think about those very things, because even though humanizing the people who are exploited to bring us relatively cheap products is shocking and difficult to swallow at times, as consumers, we’re all part of the system that keeps these people in poverty. Timmerman really illuminated this subject in a way that anyone could understand and relate to. Everyone should read this! (Source: Mena 2011 np link).

This likable book tells the story of man who wanted to know where his clothes came from. Was afraid he would come off preachy but it came out quite balanced and likable. I liked the book because he discovered that there are no easy answers. That nobody likes child labour but sometimes the alternative is worse. That there are some good laws governing garment factories and some that need to be thought out better or better enforced. What he does really well is journey into being an “engaged” consumer and he supllies his readers with tips on how to do that (Source: Shannon 2009 np link).

A very different look at the garment industry and the individuals affected by it. Introduces us to real people, real concerns, and real life, rather than throwing out numbers and statistics. Highly recommended for anyone with an interest in this topic, or in fair trade, workers’ rights, or globalization in general. An easy, fairly quick and conversational read, but meaty in content (Source: Knight 2011 np link).

It’s very easy to adopt a black and white attitude on acceptable working conditions, age, and pay if you’ve never ventured out of your own country or gone anywhere other than tourists spots. We tend to forget or have a hard time acknowledging that the norms we are used to are very specific to our circumstances. Timmerman opens the reader’s eyes to the cultural aspect of what we believe is right and wrong. He actually asks the workers about consumer movements in the countries that buy the clothes. Do they want our help? Do they want us to hold out for better working conditions for them? Are we making things better or worse with our activism? Don’t be so sure you know the answer to those questions because the answers the workers gave may surprise you (Source: Booklorn 2008 np link).

This book gave me greater insight into the true meaning of `sweatshop’ and showed that there is no black and white when deciding which companies to purchase clothing from. I was surprised to learn that the factory workers themselves protest American boycotts and not only want but need us to buy the clothing they make. Often times it is the teenagers and young adults who work so that they can send a large portion of their earnings back to their families in the countryside and they need these jobs to support them. Some of them have even paid just to have the `luxury’ of obtaining a factory job, while others use any connections they have to get them. It can be tough to know what the right course of action is when trying to shop in an ethical manner. Timmerman does a good job of outlining the issues and then offers some advice and great websites to help determine which companies deserve our business  (Source: Sheri S. 2008 np link).

These workers made it clear that they didn’t want consumers to stop purchasing their products; rather, they depended on American consumerism for their jobs. And while their jobs clearly exploited them—underpaying them or even not paying them at all some days—having the job was always better than not. This was the bind Timmerman found over and over: America’s gluttony was feeding globalization and exploitative practices, and yet to just stop buying the products was not going to help these workers (Source: George 2009 np link).

It is not surprising that he encounters heart-wrenching poverty or gains an eye-opening view of how much the average piece of American apparel is marked up. What is unexpected is the revelation of just how much harm is done to workers when overseas manufacturers are boycotted. Timmerman’s interviews with numerous factory workers make it clear that taking away their jobs is akin to creating a poverty tsunami. Yet, as Timmerman confesses, “There isn’t a single worker who makes my clothes who lives a life that I would find acceptable.” (Source: Mondor ndd np link).

…the view offered is original – we’ve all seen a few too many Panorama specials and other undercover camera programmes revealing desperate factory conditions. Timmerman considers the garment factories as a way that countries can develop with dignity, without the need to rely on the West. … Ultimately Timmerman concludes that there is little need to feel guilty about buying from companies who outsource from developing countries as you are doing the workers a favour. We need activists to work with companies, not against them, to try and increase the standards of living of the workers and this means providing the things which we take for granted: education, protection against injury and pensions to name a few. This is the only way that these countries will develop (Source: Witherow 2009 p.11 link).

If the producer’s job is to make, then what is the American’s job in the current societal fabric? Simply to consume, Timmerman ponders as he tries to eat on a Chinese worker’s salary, $3/day. Could not buying when I want tear the world apart? We see that now as US consumption decreases and the global economy collapses. People aren’t buying and the world is suffering. When laws against child labor have placed restrictions on US imports, children in these nations protested the decision. Once again, they want to work. Interestingly, the author’s allusions to the advantages of a “stone age” lifestyle are in line with the exact same observations made by Charles Eisenstein in The Ascent of Humanity (which I just finished). The truth behind the garment situation is far more complex than I ever could imagine. Its not just: sweatshops bad, made in USA good. Take the time to read this book and gain some perspective on where the globalized economy is taking the world. From the most dedicated social activist to the deepest entrenched economic globalist, this is a refreshing take on the guilt many of us wear (Source: Ritchie 2009 np link).

In our world of dehumanization and mechanization, it’s so easy to just walk into a store and buy a product off a shelf, never once thinking about where it came from or who made it. But its important to think about those very things, because even though humanizing the people who are exploited to bring us relatively cheap products is shocking and difficult to swallow at times, as consumers, we’re all part of the system that keeps these people in poverty. Timmerman really illuminated this subject in a way that anyone could understand and relate to. Everyone should read this! (Source: Mena 2011 np link).

This book is far from a “them” and “us” comparison and guilt trip. There are many complicated issues interwoven here, to be considered and discussed. The warp and woof of economic and social pluses and minuses is a constantly changing pattern, and the questions–what and where to buy, how to support or protest industry conditions, how to maintain American jobs, how to influence human rights–necessitate the participation of what the author terms “engaged consumers.” (Source: NoBooksNoLife 2008 np link).

I read his book. it one of the best book so far this summer for me. thanks for sharing. P.S I was from Cambodia 8 years ago and I worked in one of his factories he mention (Source: mskatwoman022008 2009 np link).

I really appreciate this book. Give it a chance its not depressing or preachy, and it doesn’t simplify the issues involved. It’s part travelogue so really at times its quite entertaining, even funny … Timmerman doesn’t simplify the issue for you or make you think, if you just boycott Nike that will take care of it, and i really appreciate that. The book takes us through the culture of poverty that the producers of our goods live with, and even confronts us with the fact that in a difficult place like Bangledesh, there may be worse things than child labor. He definitely wants us to think before we buy, but realize the problems in the world won’t go away with halfhearted boycotts here and there. I highly recommend this book to everyone! (Source: Amanda 2010 np link).

A more personal look at the poverty and problems of the people involved in the garment industry as well as a reminder of the ways I can make a difference. Timmerman allows the reader to laugh along with him at some of his mistakes and observations (Source: Linda 2009 np link).

This is not a feel terrible about yourself, the world sucks and it’s so bad you’re better off not thinking about it book. You will not want to slit your wrists when you finish. This is good, because instead you will see that there are real things that can be done to improve garment workers lives and as the consumer, you can have a say in getting them done. Timmerman’s writing is an easy read, but a serious topic. He handles it seriously but realistically. This book is for folks who truly care about doing the right thing but don’t want to feel like they should slit their wrists because they happened to be born really lucky (Source: Maya 2009 np link).

The thing that interested me the most was that even though the factory workers are underpaid and have very long work hours, when asked what they thought about people who boycott their employers, they responded that it is still a job for them and helps them provide for their families. Timmerman's point was that boycotting may be more harmful than helpful, which I thought to be interesting. However this point of view still does nothing to alleviate the fact that my money is going to support sweatshops, so I think some kind of middle ground would be best. Perhaps find fair trade companies to support so that the workers have good jobs at companies that treat them well (Source: Shepherd 2012 np link).

The injustices of the global clothing industry must be more thoroughly researched and addressed. Timmerman’s heartfelt, if somewhat disjointed, chronicle is a good beginning (Source: Mondor ndd np link).

Overall, the reader is left with the conclusion that the author didn’t visit anywhere that would disgust us, but rather visited places where life is tough and the only option open to many people is to work long, hard hours. It’s not the child labour itself that is awful, but the fact that it is a necessity for many children in the developing world to work. Despite Timmerman’s journey, there is a distinct sensation of dis-involvement (is that a word?) or distance in the book. The author doesn’t really make any moral judgements, but rather presents the facts for us to read and review. The pace of the first half of the book somewhat lacklustre but it does gain some momentum and attraction in the second half as the author himself appears to warm to his quest (Source: Cronin 2009 np link).

Is it better for a child to work a job in factory making things for Westerners than to beg for food/money on the street or scavenge for recyclables in the trash? Many people would have you believe that child labor is 100% bad. But what if the alternative is starvation? The laborers he talked to in China worked 6-7 days a week, 10-14 hours a day, including some hours where they were told to clock out and then come back to work. But those same people are choosing to stay there and work rather than returning to the country. One of their family members back on the country says she preferred working in the city even though she only has to work about 2 hours a day out in the country. The child of the city workers is being raised by grand parents in the country; they hadn't seen their child in 2 years. It all seems wrong, but is it our call to make? (Source: Oehrlein 2012 np link).

I have one question that remains unanswered: What happens to garment factory workers when that factory closes? It may seem inconsequential, but other aspects of what happens are covered, and how fleeting the factories can be is highlighted without answering this natural extension (Source: WordLily 2008 np link).

The author comes across as someone young and not very serious (Source: Oehrlein 2012 np link).

I find the blog to book genre sloppy. Never as good as you hope (Source: Valerie 2009 np link).

Reads like a blog of a normal tourist who went to these places (Source: Raych 2011 np link).

It’s all a bit personal rather than overly useful and, as with so much writing by younger Americans, more about the rather spoilt and self-absorbed Timmerman than anything else (Source: French 2008 np link).

This book reads as a narrative of “I went here, and I saw this” written in very mediocre language professed “beach bum.” There is little, if any research aside from the author traveling to the places and speaking with workers. While the book is very enjoyable to read, it’s very light on the facts, and unfortunately I was left feeling unfulfilled by the end (Source: Corrian 2009 np link).

Parts of this book were interesting, but Timmerman’s lightweight “I’m just an ordinary guy wearing these boxer shorts” style is a little too lightweight for the topic; I think the book would have been better served by more planning and research to support his exploration of where his clothes come from (Source: Laurie 2009 np link).

Ultimately his ignorance is maddening, however. Why didn’t he read more before setting out on his journey? Some of his writing is pointless (Source: Jacobs 2009 np link).

This is not a scholarly examination of global economics or human rights. Timmerman, in this book, is like a dumb Morgan Spurlock (he calls himself “dumb” and a “moron,” not me!) or an open-minded Michael Moore. He is not out to vilify the garment industry; he is not out to make the reader feel bad for living a modern life. He is merely presenting what he finds, both the good and the bad (Source: Wax 2009 np link).

Kelsey Timmerman’s investigation into the underbelly of globalisation is moronic. I am not being unkind. The author describes himself in his book, Where am I Wearing? , as a “touron” – part moron and part tourist. It is Timmerman’s lack of knowledge that is his selling point (Source: Jacobs 2009 np link).

…the author seems like a nice enough guy but lacking in common sense and the real ways of the world. Many of the surprising conditions he experiences on his somewhat distorted journey can be seen in many cities in the United States. Perhaps examining more of the actual figures and conversion rates of money could enlighten him that comparing wages and style of living in these countries to that of the US is not accurate … Instead of going across the world, perhaps comparing our own severely poverty ridden population with that of those with foreign jobs could prove a better comparison than to his own sheltered above middle class lifestyle (Source: Whentworth 2011 np link).

Like most of us, he wants a simple solution to the problem, rather than be faced with the paralyzing morass that is global poverty, and so he suggests some costly, if important solutions. The injustices of the global clothing industry must be more thoroughly researched and addressed. Timmerman’s heartfelt, if somewhat disjointed, chronicle is a good beginning (Source: Mondor ndd np link).

I wanted this book to go more indepth. Yes, the people that make our clothes don’t get paid a lot of money, but what other job could they be doing? I wasn’t really surprised by anything the author found out visiting the countries where his favorite clothes are made. I wanted him to spend more time with these people or sneak into the factories that wouldn’t let him in (Source: Rachel 2009 np link).

I really wanted this book to go MUCH more in depth into the ramifications of consumer society on the workers who support our ability/desire/insistence on the availability of cheap clothing, shoes and accessories. I also almost felt like the author approached the whole project kind of casually. I expected more (Source: Bookstax 2010 np link).

The author recounted his experiences of researching who made his clothes and then sort of made a quick conclusion at the end (Source: Amy 2011 np link).

While I was excited about the concept and goal of this book I found it a little light in the content department. I understand it is a complex issue, but I was also looking for a little more resolution in the end other than being “an engaged consumer”. I would still say it is worth reading, if just for the parts of one on one interaction with the garment workers (Source: Matt 2009 np link).

A quick, informal introduction to issues of globalization and economic considerations for people just beginning to think about the topic, through the mechanism of the author’s attempting to see where his clothes were manufactured. It’s fine as an introductory exploration such as might be appropriate for an undergraduate class (Source: Sho 2009 np link).

While there is some great information embedded within the writing, the naivete and ignorance of the author can be rather irritating and frustrating (Source: Mcconnell 2011 np link).

The author doesn’t really make any moral judgements, but rather presents the facts for us to read and review (Source: Cronin 2009 np link).

So, although I don't think the book is a great book, I think it brings up a lot of great questions about our interrelationships with people around the world. You won't find any simple answers here, but I think that's appropriate (Source: Oehrlein 2012 np link).

Timmerman’s style opens a space for discussion and debate. With discussion and debate comes an increase in awareness. Is that not the most important thing to come out of his work? Is the content (and perhaps it’s flaws) merely by-the-by? ... Timmerman’s ability to capture poignant moments was a highlight of the book for me really overriding my first negative impressions. At the same time, he managed to bring the people of his experiences alive and make them human. He made me think what choices I would have made; would I have given Arifa the $20? What’s my view on boycotting? “To buy or not to buy that is the question” (p.117). As the book progresses, so does he. He writes of his experiences with a more reflexive attitude. Perhaps it’s important that as the reader you develop with him. First impressions don’t have to count. You enter the book as naively as Timmerman enters his journey. So with him you begin to develop your own personal debates. Personally I enjoyed grappling with myself alongside Timmerman about what it means to be Western- what should I do about it, should I even think about it at all!? “Perhaps we are both better off not thinking about the other’s life”. Conscientious consumer vs. deliberate ignorance. “Can I afford to worry about a garment worker in Bangladesh…?” (p.238). Indeed. Grappling with my moral conscience continues…“It’s unnatural for producer and consumer to meet” (p.67). ... In this updated and revised second edition, he opens with admitting his flaws in brevity; “I’ve always felt this book was missing something”- turns out he simply ‘chickened out’ of asking the meaty questions! “I think deep-down I didn’t want to know the realities of Amilcar’s life, so I didn’t ask…” In fact he even says that if it weren’t for the complete silliness of him giving Amilcar his T-shirt in the first place, Amilcar wouldn’t have remembered him at all! So his naivety did have its place in the end (Source: Bird 2012 np link).

This is one fantastic book. “Where am I Wearing” is a thought-provoking book that raises more questions than it answers - but that’s Timmerman’s main thrust: economic justice is a tricky business, with few black or white answers. Timmerman comes across as a very likeable, average American - not an academic type at all. His profiles of those who make our clothing are riveting. Anyone interested in social justice, clothing or crazy road trips should read this book. I just hope Timmerman writes a sequel - maybe, “Where am I Eating” (Source: Bete 2008 np link).

Impacts / Outcomes

Thought-provoking. Takes on both sides of the “sweatshop” debate. I’m reading clothing lables–and getting an education. Highly recommended. Update: Now that I’ve finished reading this book, hmmm… Several thoughts. First of all, while it does not go “in depth” and take on the politics of consumerism, it does take on the idea that each of us needs to become aware of what goes on around us–as well as what goes on our backs. It’s a balanced and reasonable approach to individual awareness and responsibility, instead of ending by telling us what to think, how to dress, where to buy our clothes. In the end, it’s about each of us doing a little work for ourselves. I like that Timmerman has layed the groudwork without doing all the work for me. Now I can make my own choice as to how much involvement I put into the world around me on a consumer level. Not preachy or over-bearing but it does make me think about what–and where–I am wearing (Source: S. 2009 np link).
 
“We always try to select books with global issues for the Readership WT program and to have students consider what kind of impact they can have on our local and global communities,” Kendra Campbell, director of First Year Experience, said. “With this year’s book, Kelsey Timmerman gives us insight into the lives of people from several locations around the world and has us consider how we are connected to their circumstances.” (Source: McDonald 2011 np link).

I read this book for a Social Welfare class last semester (Aug-Dec 2010) and it was definitely something I wasn’t to interested in before I started. Once I got started though, I couldn’t stop. Like the critical reviews say its not terribly scientific research. But it is a great in depth look at the lives of the REAL people who make the clothes we mindlessly wear every day. I went to China a few weeks after I finished reading the book and it helped give me a different perspective when it came to talking with the people there. This book is a cultural eye-opener (Source: Gibson 2011 np link).

The reader should be aware that reading “Where am I Wearing” might be uncomfortable. It might force you to look at your own life differently, and it will likely move you to action of some sort (even if just to look at your own tags before you get dressed in the morning) (Source: Moneysaver3 2008 np link).

It’s very interesting to think about oneself as primarily a consumer. It’s not fun, though (for me, anyway) (Source: WordLily 2008 np link).

It gives you pause to think that forbidding child labor could actually be a BAD thing. Imagine if your other choices were begging or digging around toxic garbage dumps for anything to sell (Source: Wellington 2009 np link).

Makes the reader think about the fact that these children NEED the jobs; if child labor was outlawed, the children and their families would be destitute (Source: Ellen 2009 np link).

No. I’m not going to tell myself it’s okay and go back to buying those cheaply made products and benefit off their little backs and tell myself it’s okay, and I don’t think that makes me some kneejerk reactionary. Continuing to support the companies only ensures that the cycle continues (Source: Pithlit 2008 np link).

I still don’t know if buying from companies who employ child labor is fundamentally all bad, when the reality is that my not buying the shirt does not translate into food on that child’s dinner table - or even assure that the child has a table on which to eat. In a world where people experience abject poverty, and therefore are stuck in jobs that do not pay them fairly, what are the ethics behind my purchasing the work of their hands? I am left with unresolved yet urgent questions (Source: George 2009 np link).

Easy enlightening read. Made me more grateful for where I am living and put a face on the people who made my clothes (Source: Amy 2011 np link).

This made me examine my own privileges as a consumer in the developed world, and also my own (often wrong) assumptions about the people who do work in factories in developing countries (Source: Alarra 2011 np link).

This really was an interesting book. I didn’t think I would care about this topic or understand it but the author did a great job explaining things. He made the issues personal. He also provided detailed steps how we all can find out “where we are wearing”. The readers will have a hard time looking at their clothing the same way (Source: Wrighty 2008 np link).

After reading the book, I found I was much more cognizant of where my clothing was coming from. While I do not know how to solve the problems confronted by the underpaid workers who make my clothing, I now see them as real people. They are not just mindless beings doing what none of us would do. They are real people trying to make things better for their children just as we do. Thanks so much, Kelsey, for giving these people a face … I would highly recommend this book to anyone who thinks we are not a part of the global market (Source: Vigus 2010 np link).

Consumerism is something I think about more, and how do I consume in the best way possible for the world in general, not just myself. Is it cheaper to buy up all the crap on Old Navy clearance racks, yes, but I began to stop doing it when I made myself think about the way people making the clothes lived (Source: Amanda 2010 np link).

Where Am I Wearing? gives an excellent starting point for discussions in order to make informed decisions, as we determine a responsible course as the leading consumers of garments and other manufactured goods in the worldwide economic balance (Source: NoBooksNoLife 2008 np link).

The consumers still hold a great deal of power. You and I as consumers - thousands of miles from the source of production - still have the platform to pressure companies to change their practices. But will we? And if so, how do we go about it? (Source: George 2009 np link).

He inspired me to do a little “tag-checking” of my own and made me think about the places from which my clothes and other manufactured products come (Source: Pierce 2009 np link).

It’s an experience every American could use in their lifetime (Source: Moneysaver3 2008 np link).

This book left me intrigued and fascinated with where my clothes are made. Not only that, but it left me wanting to know the origin of everything I use on a daily basis. I doubt anyone could leave this book without feeling the need to do something (Source: Moneysaver3 2008 np link).

After reading the book, it did not make me feel the need to change my buying habits, but it did make me more aware of the world around me (Source: Wax 2009 np link).

So that’s what I’m doing, I’m becoming an engaged consumer.  This is just the beginning (Source: Heartsleeves 2011 np link).

For better or worse we are in a global economy and I appreciate knowing more about the working and living conditions of garment workers overseas. I appreciate having a more complete perspective when I make my decision about where to buy my clothes. I hope everyone is thinking about these issues (Source: Maya 2009 np link).

I appreciate Kelsey’s courage to embark on this quest of finding his clothes origins. And also thank him for making at least this reader a little more mindful of his clothing choices (Source: Wellington 2009 np link).

It will definitely give me pause to consider the consequences of my purchases, and I believe that is the primary purpose of Timmerman’s book (Source: Dean 2009 np link).

However, many very interesting points and A LOT of food for thought, with some geography and history thrown in for good measure. I work in the clothing industry…made me consider and re-evaluate and see my vocation in new light (Source: Valerie 2009 np link).

When I started reading Where Am I Wearing ..., I was expecting to get answers for my ambivalence. But, I didn’t get answers. The book’s author, Kelsey Timmerman, just helped me arrive at new questions about the complexities of globalization, the garment industry, and poverty—and my role in it as a consumer (Source: George 2009 np link).

…it finished strong with constructive, positive suggestions regarding where we might go from here in our journey toward both acknowledging and acting constructively upon the message that “Globalization isn’t something that just happens to economies. It happens to people” (p 242). And this book is not only the story of a handful of those people. It it is also our story, and we have the power to write the ending (Source: Julie H. 2011 np link).

I hope the message of this book never leaves me. I now have a new and huge appreciation for the privileged lives that most of us live in this country. I feel blessed/puzzled/amazed/ashamed/ grateful that I have so much(stuff!) and most especially am so FREE to do as I please, when I please, where I please. Freedom means A LOT!!! I now see faces/lives/emotions behind the people who work so terribly hard making all my stuff! kelsey, please send them a great big thank you for me! Never again will I take my new Teva sandals, my t-shirts or LL Bean jeans for granted. I wish I could give to these hard working people as they have given to us (Source: HorseGirl2 2012 np link).

The truth behind the garment situation is far more complex than I ever could imagine. Its not just: sweatshops bad, made in USA good. From the most dedicated social activist to the deepest entrenched economic globalist, this is a refreshing take on the guilt many of us wear (Source: Justin 2009 np link).

As I sit here typing this book review from my MacBook Pro, wearing UGG boots, Victoria Secret yoga pants made in Vietnam, a North Face vest made in Nicaragua, and drinking a Starbucks coffee, while listening to my salsa Marc Anthony Pandora station I can’t help but still feel guilty about my choices as a consumer. Yes competition is good; being interconnected by technological advances to various cultures is a great privilege. However, at the end of the day what it comes down to is what you do as a person to try to help “fight” other injustices. I feel like one has to pick and choose our battles. You can’t win them all. It all starts with openness to others’ opinions/lives and being able to take something from that, by learning something new or by being able to empathize with such unjust social issues. One can make a difference in many ways. You just have to figure out how can you do that best. I for one have chosen my major as a social worker for such reasons as well as my major in social justice studies. How will you make your mark for a better/ more humane world? (Source: Perez 2012 np link).

The Where Am I Wearing? 2nd edition is out! Now with 38.4% more words! It was a pretty major update. All of the old material is still there, but there are also about 25,000 new words. I always felt that the book was incomplete. I went to Honduras, met a garment worker named Amilcar who I chatted with for 10 minutes, I didn’t ask him the questions I wanted to know (dude, is this a sweatshop?), I went home and was haunted by Amilcar, so I went to Bangladesh, Cambodia, and China to meet the people who made my clothes and ask them the questions I didn’t ask Amiclar. But what about Amilcar? (Source: Timmerman, K. 2012 np link).

I know where Amilcar is. He is in the US -in New Mexico in fact. He’s looking for sample and small production contract sewing work. I work with him (I’m a pattern maker). I can’t post his information because too many people have taken advantage of him. I make the patterns and then send them to him for sewing. I don’t charge a mark up on his work; he bills the customer directly -although I DO make sure he is charging enough and that he gets a deposit before he starts work (Source: Kathleen 2012 np link).

New content includes: - Astonishing search for the Amilcar in Honduras who inspired the book and who traveled a death-defying journey of love, sacrifice, and hope (you’ll never guess where I found him!) - A visit to a fair trade Ethiopian shoe factory that is changing lives one job at time - Updates on the lives of the workers I met and how rising food costs and declining orders in the wake of the global financial crisis have squeezed them - New tips on how to be an engaged consumer - A call to arms for glocals (global and local citizens) - Discussion guide and activities for educators focusing on sweatshops, child labor, fair trade, globalization, global poverty, immigration, individual and corporate social responsibility, labor rights, microcredit, international aid, and global development - Service-Learning ideas for educator - Note to freshmen on how to get the most out of their college journey. I wrote the 1st edition of WEARING within a few months of returning from the adventure. Then, the jury was still out on how the experience changed me. And boy did it! Writing the 2nd edition allows me to share the big takeaways from my adventure (Source: Timmerman, K. 2012 np link).

References / Further Reading

Alarra (2011) Alarra’s Review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 11 August (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/193162334 last accessed 6 November 2011)

Amanda (2010) Amanda’s review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 31 May (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/105003958 last accessed 5 November 2011)

Amazon (2011) Where am I Wearing?: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People That Make Our Clothes [Hardcover], Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Where-Wearing-Countries-Factories-Clothes/dp/0470376546 last accessed 29 October 2011)

Amazon (2011) Where am I Wearing?: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People That Make Our Clothes [Hardcover], Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Where-Wearing-Countries-Factories-Clothes/dp/0470376546 last accessed 4 November 2011)

Amy (2011) Amy’s Review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 9 August (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/168870526 last accessed 6 November 2011)

Anon (2008) Where Am I Wearing by Kelsey Timmerman (Review) Booklorn.com (http://www.booklorn.com/where-am-i-wearing-by-kelsey-timmerman-review/ last accessed 31 October 2011)

Anon (2011) Kelsey Timmerman to Speak at WTAMU Convocation, Targeted News Service, 8 November

Berman, J. (2009) Where Am I Wearing: Kelsey the Touron Travels to the Origin of his Clothes, The Tranquilo Traveler, joshuaberman.net, 3 May. (http://blog.joshuaberman.net/09-05/where-am-i-wearing-kelsey-the-touron-travels-to-the-origin-of-his-clothes.html last accessed 29 October 2011)

Bete, T. (2008) Customer Review, Piher.net, 15 November (http://www.piher.net/book/Where-am-I-Wearing-A-Global-Tour-to-the-Countries-Factories-and-People-that-Make-Our-Clothes/p222315/ last accessed 5 November 2011)

Bete, T. (2012) This is a Must Read, Amazon.com, 10 May (http://www.amazon.com/Where-Wearing-Countries-Factories-Clothes/product-reviews/1118277554/ref=pr_all_summary_cm_cr_acr_txt?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1 last accessed 19 June 2012)

Bird, E. (2012) ftt summer intern Ellie Bird reviews Kelsey Timmerman’s ‘Where am I wearing?’ iwanttodiscussthat.wordpress.com 5 October (http://iwanttodiscussthat.wordpress.com/2012/10/05/ftt-summer-intern-ellie-bird-reviews-kelsey-timmermans-where-am-i-wearing/ last accessed 12 October 2012)

Bookstax (2010) Bookstax’s Review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 16 May (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/100982160 last accessed 6 November 2011)

Cindy (2008) Where am I Wearing? Cindysloveofbooks.com, 19 November (http://cindysloveofbooks.blogspot.com/2008/11/where-am-i-wearing.html last accessed 31 October 2011)

Corrian (2009) Customer Review, Piher.com, 22 April (http://www.piher.net/book/Where-am-I-Wearing-A-Global-Tour-to-the-Countries-Factories-and-People-that-Make-Our-Clothes/p222315/ last accessed 5 November 2011)

Cronin, J. (2009) A challenging view on the clothes we wear, Amazon.com, 12 January (http://www.amazon.co.uk/product-reviews/0470376546/ref=sr_cr_hist_4?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=0&filterBy=addFourStar last accessed 5 November 2011)

Dean (2009) Dean’s Review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 22 June (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/57116890 last accessed 6 November 2011)

Ellen (2009) Ellen’s Review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 22 November (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/78623241 last accessed 6 November 2011)

French, P. (2008) Business ethics: Five books on China that might prove useful, ethicalcorp.com, 4 August (http://www.ethicalcorp.com/environment/business-ethics-five-books-china-might-prove-useful last accessed 6 November 2011)

George, K. (2009) Book Review: Where am I Wearing? A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes.Christian Feminism Today (http://www.eewc.com/CFT/v33n2r1.htm last accessed 31 October 2011)

Gibson, S. (2011) Customer Review, Amazon.com, 18 January (http://www.amazon.com/review/R2KXZU6XUBLGIJ/ref=cm_cr_pr_perm?ie=UTF8&ASIN=0470376546&nodeID=&tag=&linkCode last accessed 4 November 2011)

Anon (2008) Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/4857693-where-am-i-wearing last accessed 5 November 2011)

Heartsleeves (2011) Where Are You Wearing, Adventures in Sustainable Fashion, heartsleevesblog.com, 2 November (http://heartsleevesblog.com/2011/11/02/where-are-you-wearing/#comments last accessed 19 June 2012)

Holland, E. (2008) Book Review: Where Am I Wearing? by Kelsey Timmerman, Matadornetwork.com, 22 December (http://matadornetwork.com/goods/book-review-where-am-i-wearing-by-kelsey-timmerman/ last accessed 4 November 2011)

HorseGirl2 (2012) This book leaves a meaningful, lasting Impression, Amazon.com, 11 June (http://www.amazon.com/Where-Wearing-Countries-Factories-Clothes/product-reviews/1118277554/ref=pr_all_summary_cm_cr_acr_txt?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1 last accessed 19 June 2012)

Jacobs, E. (2009) Book Review: ‘Well-worn path’, Financial Times, ft.com, 24 January (http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/430c7afc-e9bb-11dd-9535-0000779fd2ac.html#axzz1ckS9mBmO  last accessed 3 November 2011)

John (2009) How our clothes are made, usnews.com, 6 June (http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/alpha-consumer/2008/12/03/podcast-how-our-clothes-are-made last accessed 5 November 2011)

Julie H. (2011) Julie H.’s Review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 11 December (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/131507760 last accessed 6 November 2011)

Justin (2009) Justin’s Review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 25 February (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/47099806 last accessed 5 November 2011)

Kathleen (2012) Comment: Where am I Wearing 2nd edition is out, whereamiwearing.com, 12 June (http://whereamiwearing.com/2012/04/16/where-am-i-wearing-2nd-edition-is-out/ last accessed 19 June 2012)

Klopfer, L. (nda) Lisa Klopfer’s Editorial Review, Where am I Wearing?: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Barnesandnoble.com (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/where-am-i-wearing-kelsey-timmerman/1013816903 last accessed 6 November 2011)

Knight, K. (2011) Katriena Knight’s Review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 29 June (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/166264874 last accessed 6 November 2011)

KrisT (2010) KrisT’s Review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 2 February (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/87955715 last accessed 5 November 2011)

Linda (2009) Linda’s Review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 8 June (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/57533588 last accessed 6 November 2011)

Marie (2008) Marie’s Review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 11 December (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/39912808 last accessed 6 November 2011)

Mascari, M. (2011) Mary’s Review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 29 September (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/206712658 last accessed 29 September 2011)

Matt (2009) Matt’s Review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 12 January (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/42777900 last accessed 6 November 2011)

Maya (2009) Maya’s Review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 18 June (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/60235212 last accessed 5 November 2011)

Mcconnell, M. (2011) Michele Mcconnell’s Review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 6 July (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/152750681 last accessed 6 November 2011)

Mena, J. (2011) Jody Mena’s Review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 2 August (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/193422673 last accessed 29 September 2011)

Mondor, C. (ndd) Editorial Review, Amazon.com, (http://www.amazon.com/Where-Wearing-Countries-Factories-Clothes/dp/product-description/0470376546/ref=dp_proddesc_0?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books last accessed 6 November 2011)

Moneysaver3 (2008) HIGHLY recommended, Amazon.com,14 November (http://www.amazon.com/Where-Wearing-Countries-Factories-Clothes/dp/0470376546 last accessed 3 November 2011)

mskatwoman022008 (2009) Where am I Wearing, Youtube.com (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yCQa-2z80Vc last accessed 5 November 2011)

NoBooksNoLife (2008) WHERE are YOU wearing?, Amazon.com, 15 November (http://www.amazon.com/Where-Wearing-Countries-Factories-Clothes/dp/0470376546 last accessed 3 November 2011)

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Ollivier, L. (2008) And where was your underwear made? Amazon.com, 26 November (http://www.amazon.com/review/R1AKZJ7ZJQBYGM/ref=cm_cr_pr_perm?ie=UTF8&ASIN=0470376546&nodeID=&tag=&linkCode last accessed 4 November 2011)

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Pfeiffer University (2010) Pfeiffer hosts author of “Where am I Wearing?” Kelsey Timmerman Sept. 16-17 Pfeiffer University, 9 September (http://www.pfeiffer.edu/news-media/2716-pfeiffer-presents-author-of-where-am-i-wearing-kelsey-timmerman-sept-16-17 last accessed 31 October 2011)

Pierce, D. (2009) Awesome and Informative Book!! Amazon.com, 5 December (http://www.amazon.com/review/R2MVOIPBFXNUDK/ref=cm_cr_pr_perm?ie=UTF8&ASIN=0470376546&nodeID=&tag=&linkCode last accessed 4 November 2011)

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Rachel (2009) Rachel’s Review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 24 February (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/47358721 last accessed 6 November 2011)

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Wax, A. (2009) Book Review: Where am I Wearing? A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Blogcritics.org, 16 February (http://blogcritics.org/books/article/book-review-where-am-i-wearing/page-2/ last accessed 29 October 2011)

Wellington (2009) Wellington’s Review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 22 February (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/47217285 last accessed 6 November 2011)

Whentworth, A. (2011) Naive about the world, Amazon.com, 12 July (http://www.amazon.com/Where-Wearing-Countries-Factories-Clothes/product-reviews/0470376546/ref=cm_cr_dp_synop/188-6921199-4154935?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=0&sortBy=bySubmissionDateDescending#R32M1L8DR9I5HM last accessed 3 November 2011)

Witherow, T. (2009) Book Review: Where am I wearing? Etonomics, p.11 (http://www.tutor2u.net/blog/files/What_I_Am_Wearing.pdf last accessed 6 November 2011)

WordLily (2008) Where Am I Wearing? By Kelsey Timmerman, Wordlily.com, 20 November (http://wordlily.com/2008/11/20/where-am-i-wearing-by-kelsey-timmerman/ last accessed 31 October 2011)

Anon. (ndc) World Vision Report, Where am I wearing? worldvision.org (http://www.worldvision.org/worldvision/radio.nsf/stable/wvradiostory_fashion1hr_whereamiwearing last accessed 6 November 2011)

Wrighty (2008) Wrighty’s Review, Where am I Wearing: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People that Make Our Clothes, Goodreads.com, 26 November (http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/36043027 last accessed 5 November 2011)

Extras

Kelsey Timmerman’s blog: www.whereamiwearing.com

TheTouronKing (2009) Where am I Wearing? Youtube.com, 26 June http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yCQa-2z80Vc

What the author said about an earlier version of this page

This is by far the most extensive review of everything that’s ever been said about my book. You all really did your homework. I’m impressed. Although I’m surprised that you didn’t call my grandma to see what she thought. Need her number? (Source: Timmerman 2011 link)

Compiled by Emma Baker, Eleanor Bird, Gemma Crease, Imogen Crookes and Coralie Sucker, edited by Eleanor Bird and Ian Cook (last updated October 2012). Page created for followthethings.com as part of the ‘Geographies of Material Cultures’ module, University of Exeter. Thanks to Kelsey Timmerman for the product photo, and to Sue Rouillard for photoshopping it.